Offer Accepted

Maentwrog, Blaenau Ffestiniog, Gwynedd, LL41 4HP
Guide Price, £145,000

Bed icon  3    Bath icon  1    receptions icon  1

Maentwrog, Blaenau Ffestiniog, Gwynedd, LL41 4HP

Another unusual surprise property for you! Grade II Listed 3 bedroom stone cottage with overgrown gardens and a dilapidated Grade II Listed barn in a streamside location opposite.

Extensive refurbishment and upgrading is required to release the full potential of this uncompleted project, with unfinished electrics and a partially fitted kitchen - That's why it looks such a bargain!  Derlwyn was formerly 2 separate cottages and it still retains some character features including exposed beams, stonework and wooden windows.

It's rather romantic!

Grade II Listed three bedroom stone cottage in need of renovation, along with a dilapidated Grade II Listed stone and slate barn in the garden on the opposite side of the road.  Exposed stonework and beams and an eye catching price, but there will be lots of work involved. 

Location

This cottage stands on the main A496 that runs through the village and backs on to the woodland of Coed Camlyn.  There are lovely views of the Moelwyn mountains and the Dwyryd estuary opposite.  Maentwrog village stands within a picturesque environment in the Snowdonia National Park.  The village has  a traditional inn, the Grapes Hotel, well known for its food and atmosphere. The Oakley Arms Hotel and pub is also within a few minutes stroll. The scenic area around Maentwrog has many public footpaths, the beauty spot of Tan Y Bwlch and Llyn Mair as well as the Ffestiniog Steam Railway within a mile or two.

Penrhyndeudraeth is approximately 4 miles away and provides a variety of shops, restaurants, takeaways etc. There is also a doctor’s surgery, pub, garage/filling station, railway stations. The main local harbour town of Porthmadog is approximately 8 miles from Maentwrog where there are an even wider variety of shops, leisure centre and amenities.

Take the A496 north from Barmouth in the direction of Harlech.  After 11 miles continue past Harlech and through Talsarnau after about another 3 miles.  Continue straight through the village of Llandecwyn and past Briwat Bridge on the left-hand side.  Continue straight ahead for about another 3 miles to Maentwrog and look out for the cottage on your right just past the village sign and the barn is opposite on the left.

Directions

Some history of Derlwyn - Following the death of William Gruffydd Oakeley of Plas Tan y Bwlch in 1835 the estate was left to his widow Louisa Oakeley and then on to William Edward Oakeley, William Gruffydd's nephew.  Louisa suddenly left Maentwrog in 1868 and did not return before her death in 1878.  The estate was therefore left under the management of William Edward Oakeley from 1869 onwards and despite the depletion of the family fortune and the decline of the slate industry towards the end of the 19th century he embarked on a programme of rebuilding and improvement of the estate. He rebuilt many of the houses in the village and also extended the village with the erection of several new properties to the south and west ends of the village.  One of the buildings built at this time was the school, erected in 1871-72 and Derlwyn, at the time a pair of cottages, was probably built shortly after that.  

Offered up for sale in the auction of the Plas Tan y Bwlch estate in 1910 - Lot 12 "The Picturesque Rural Village of Maentwrog".  The property is thought to have been that described as Storehouse - a pair of cottages, occupied by G M Richards and J Richards, for an annual rent of £2 15 shillings and £2 10 shillings respectively.

Exterior - Two storey cottage, originally a pair, a linear range of mortared rubble masonry with long stones as lintels.  Vernacular character, in contrast to the estate signature employed elsewhere in the village.  Slate roof with stone gable stacks with dripstones and capping.  A long 5 window range with doorway offset to the left, former doorway in the 2nd opening from the right end, now partially blocked and with a window in the upper part. The doorway houses a simple boarded door and the windows are of timber casements of 2 lights.  First floor windows over alternate ground floor openings and set under the eaves.  

Reason for listing - listed as a former pair of late 19th century cottages retaining a simple traditional character and forming a group with the haybarn opposite. The haybarn opposite was listed as a good example of this building type which is especially characteristic of this area.

General Information

Accommodation

Kitchen

4.53m x 3.22m (14' 10" x 10' 7")
Hardwood main front entrance door, tiled floor, range of free standing solid wood kitchen units with polished stone worktops, Belfast sink with mixer tap, Zanussi washing machine, wall unit housing electric fuse box, wall mounted plate rack, glazed display cupboards, unit with inset Whirlpool induction hob, space for oven, corner base unit, further tall storage cupboards, opening through to:

Lounge/Dining Room

6.03m x 4.54m (19' 9" x 14' 11")
Beamed ceiling, open fireplace with stone surround, wall light points, storage heater, staircase.

First Floor Landing

Wall light, cupboard housing hot water cylinder with immersion heaters, traditional style timber doors and latches leading to:

Bedroom 1

4.53m x 3.37m (14' 10" x 11' 1")
Vaulted ceiling with exposed beams, exposed stonework to wall.

Bedroom 2

2.78m x 2.4m (9' 1" x 7' 10")

Bedroom 3

2.91m x 1.99m (9' 7" x 6' 6")

Bathroom

3.1m x 2.5m (10' 2" x 8' 2") max.
Corner spa bath, toilet, basin, shower cubicle.

Outside

Gardens

The cottage is very slightly set back from the road with a shallow frontage. Steps lead up the right hand side to a triangular shaped, overgrown side garden with a dilapidated stone shed. This garden extends around to the rear to the left hand side but it is totally overgrown by brambles.

On the opposite side of the road there is a further are of land,which is again overgrown. here stands a dilapidated Grade II Listed Barn with open bays and a slate roof. This garden area is bounded by a small stream. The owner has told us he has treated Japanese knotweed that was growing here but we think it is unlikely to have been totally eradicated. It is envisaged that the area could provide off road parking and garaging subject to necessary consents.

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01341 281 599


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Take the A496 north from Barmouth in the direction of Harlech.  After 11 miles continue past Harlech and through Talsarnau after about another 3 miles.  Continue straight through the village of Llandecwyn and past Briwat Bridge on the left-hand side.  Continue straight ahead for about another 3 miles to Maentwrog and look out for the cottage on your right just past the village sign and the barn is opposite on the left.

Some history of Derlwyn - Following the death of William Gruffydd Oakeley of Plas Tan y Bwlch in 1835 the estate was left to his widow Louisa Oakeley and then on to William Edward Oakeley, William Gruffydd's nephew.  Louisa suddenly left Maentwrog in 1868 and did not return before her death in 1878.  The estate was therefore left under the management of William Edward Oakeley from 1869 onwards and despite the depletion of the family fortune and the decline of the slate industry towards the end of the 19th century he embarked on a programme of rebuilding and improvement of the estate. He rebuilt many of the houses in the village and also extended the village with the erection of several new properties to the south and west ends of the village.  One of the buildings built at this time was the school, erected in 1871-72 and Derlwyn, at the time a pair of cottages, was probably built shortly after that.  

Offered up for sale in the auction of the Plas Tan y Bwlch estate in 1910 - Lot 12 "The Picturesque Rural Village of Maentwrog".  The property is thought to have been that described as Storehouse - a pair of cottages, occupied by G M Richards and J Richards, for an annual rent of £2 15 shillings and £2 10 shillings respectively.

Exterior - Two storey cottage, originally a pair, a linear range of mortared rubble masonry with long stones as lintels.  Vernacular character, in contrast to the estate signature employed elsewhere in the village.  Slate roof with stone gable stacks with dripstones and capping.  A long 5 window range with doorway offset to the left, former doorway in the 2nd opening from the right end, now partially blocked and with a window in the upper part. The doorway houses a simple boarded door and the windows are of timber casements of 2 lights.  First floor windows over alternate ground floor openings and set under the eaves.  

Reason for listing - listed as a former pair of late 19th century cottages retaining a simple traditional character and forming a group with the haybarn opposite. The haybarn opposite was listed as a good example of this building type which is especially characteristic of this area.





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